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How to Create an Unconventional Wedding Look

Not every bride is a white dress, church ceremony, ballroom reception kind of bride. Nope. In fact, these days, most aren’t. Having planned more then 800 weddings, Floral & Event Designer Nancy Liu Chin knows a thing or two about what’s trending and what’s not. And the Unconventional Couple? They are officially a thing. So – together with crazy talented planner and designer, Christina Nichols of Parker Nichols Events – the pair is breaking down the components needed to truly design an aesthetically gorgeous though unconventional affair – from color selection to gown choice, any everything in between. Renowned Photographer Kevin Chin (who also happens to be Nancy’s hubs!) is behind all of this gorgeous imagery.

BE BRAVE WITH ATTIRE

As brides want to personalize their wedding, one way to do it is to stand out and wear something unexpected. The trendsetting brides often opt away from just the traditional white gown and put their own spin on what to wear down the aisle. Whether it’s donning a different colored gown like a blush, a mauve, or even a darker hue like a black (oh so Sarah Jessica Parker), this is surely one way to be a little unconventional.

“I would wear black if I were to do it again as it suits my own personality … my favorite gowns are always dark!” Nancy Liu Chin, Planner

SWAP OUT TRADITIONAL SEASONALLY BASED COLOR PALETTES

There is nothing like a pastel spring wedding. Or bright summer affair. But isn’t it time to mix it up? Why not have pastels in the late summer or fall? One way to do it is to ground the lighter hue with a deeper and moodier hue. Adding darker hues bring a little glam as well as a little richness. Look at the possibilities of the black chairs with the pastel flowers. Such contrast is so pleasing and makes a normal spring palette, now ready for Fall.

CREATE AN OLD MEETS NEW MASH-UP

Is there a way to incorporate Vintage and make it Modern? There is when it’s done in such a way in which something that looks old can still be meaningful for today. Christina paired a black console table from Found Vintage Rentals with a modern, straightforward tiered cake done so elegantly by A Spoonful of Sugar Cakes. The simplicity of the modern handmade flowers is so unconventional clean that it makes the vintage aspect fresh and new. The juxtaposition of these two items makes for a refreshing detail. Same goes for invitations. Modern shapes like a rectangular and long invitation paired with a clean font that is enriched with a Chinoiserie pattern (hand painted by Elsa Madeline) makes for a new twist on something old.

Natural, classic, but an oval floral bouquet by Nancy Liu Chin Designs is styled with a structured, deep ebony gown and a model who has simple makeup and natural flowing hair is an update. In the past, a formal gown would mean an updo but with natural flowers and a high fashion gown, you don’t need to make the makeup or hair too stuffy. From head to toe, this look is crisp and clean.

Lastly, we love embracing the old but making it new again. For example, old-fashioned drinks have been the rage in lounges and bars for quite a while. Why not pick one that works for you? An 80’s favorite appetizer like a Beggar’s purses found a new modern styling with Betty Zlatchin Catering. We served our vintage cocktail of choice, the French 75, in champagne coupes (see the recipe by Betty Zlatchin below). Poetry is another option! One of Christina’s favorite elements from this inspired shoot was to bring in a quote from the poem that inspired it all, She Walks in Beauty by Lord Byron. The use of poetry, a wonderful quote that ties in the design, the mood, and really sets the tone of what the whole event is going to be about. Whatever you embrace, whatever is personal, whatever unconventional thing that you add that will make your wedding a little more special, just remember to make it about the two of you.

Who Pays for What for the Wedding?

When it comes to , there are differing views. Back in the day, (and paying for) the entire celebration. Today, most people believe for their own wedding—especially if they have for some time. Of course, parents often want to pitch in. Contributions should be negotiated according to willingness and ability, but the traditional divisions on the following slides will offer some more guidance on who pays for what at a wedding.

Whether your parents (or your future spouse’s parents) are generously , it’s helpful to understand who historically has paid for each aspect of the big day. While it’s by no means mandatory for the bride’s family to pay for and the groom’s parents to foot the bill for , a working knowledge of how a wedding bill typically shakes out will help everyone navigate this tricky business.

Here, what you need to know about how a traditional budget breaks down, plus tips to help you decide who will pay for what.

Who Pays for the Engagement Party?

Traditionally, the bride’s parents (although anyone can host!) will pay for and throw an engagement party for their daughter and her husband-to-be, for the express purpose of welcoming him and introducing friends and extended family to the groom and his family and friends. Although this isn’t a requirement, it can be a wonderful way to get future wedding guests together to establish a rapport before the event—familiar faces always make for a more convivial affair.

 

Who pays for the Wedding Reception?

Of all their duties, the bride’s parents’ role as host and hostess of the reception is foremost. This honor is theirs because traditionally they pay for part, if not all, of the festivities. As such, their names have historically gone , and they play a special role at the reception of and ensuring that everything runs smoothly.

 

 

 

 

Who Pays for the Engagement Party?

Traditionally, the bride’s parents (although anyone can host!) will pay for and throw an engagement party for their daughter and her husband-to-be, for the express purpose of welcoming him and introducing friends and extended family to the groom and his family and friends. Although this isn’t a requirement, it can be a wonderful way to get future wedding guests together to establish a rapport before the event—familiar faces always make for a more convivial affair.

 

Who pays for the Wedding Reception?

Of all their duties, the bride’s parents’ role as host and hostess of the reception is foremost. This honor is theirs because traditionally they pay for part, if not all, of the festivities. As such, their names have historically gone , and they play a special role at the reception of and ensuring that everything runs smoothly.

 

 

 

Traditional Wedding Vows for Your Ceremony

Vows for religious weddings vary according to the specific religion. In Jewish ceremonies, vows are recited only when the ring is given (or rings are exchanged), but in the rest of the examples we’ve assembled here, the declaration of vows symbolizes the moment when a bride and groom become husband and wife. There are several ways to perform the following monologue-style vows: You can memorize the words ahead of time; you can repeat them after the officiant; or the officiant can say them in the form of a question, and you can respond with “I do” or “I will.” Variations on the traditional wording can often be accommodated; discuss any desired changes with your clergy member.

Catholic
“I, , take you, , for my lawful wife/husband, to have and to hold from this day forward, for better, for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health, until death do us part. I will love and honor you all the days of my life.”

Episcopal
“In the name of God, I, , take you, , to be my wife/husband, to have and to hold from this day forward, for better, for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, until parted by death. This is my solemn vow.”

Presbyterian
“I, , take you, , to be my wife/husband, and I do promise and covenant, before God and these witnesses, to be your loving and faithful husband/wife in plenty and in want, in joy and in sorrow, in sickness and in health, as long as we both shall live.”

Protestant
“I, , take thee, , to be my wedded wife/husband, to have and to hold from this day forward, for better, for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, till death do us part, according to God’s holy ordinance; and thereto I pledge thee my faith.”

Quaker
“In the presence of God and these our friends, I take thee to be my wife/husband, promising with divine assistance to be unto thee a loving and faithful husband/wife so long as we both shall live.”

Unitarian/Universalist
“I, , take you, , to be my wife/husband, to have and to hold, from this day forward, for better for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and cherish always.”

Interfaith
“I,, take you, , to be my wife/husband. I promise to be true to you in good times and in bad, in sickness and in health. I will love and honor you all the days of my life.”

Nondenominational
_, I now take you to be my wedded wife/husband, to live together after God’s ordinance in the holy relationship of marriage. I promise to love and comfort you, honor and keep you, and forsaking all others, I will be yours alone as long as we both shall live.”

Eight Things the Best Man Can Do to Be Helpful on the Morning of the Wedding

Since the maid of honor is busy taking care of the bride on the wedding day, it’s only fitting that the best man be available to help the groom. Here, a couple of big-day tasks that the groom’s right hand man should plan to take care of, as well as a few ways he can ensure the entire day runs smoothly.

Keep the groom calm.

If he’s got the jitters hours before the wedding, do something with him that’ll make him relax. Play his favorite music, throw a Frisbee around in the park, watch a favorite movie, or make him laugh.

Encourage the groom and groomsmen to keep the pre-ceremony drinks to a minimum.

It’s pretty common for both sides of the wedding party to enjoy a few celebratory drinks ahead of the ceremony, but keep the groom and the rest of the groomsmen from over-indulging. It’s important that the groom remembers this momentous day clearly, and you want to ensure the rest of the attendants make it down the aisle in an orderly fashion.

Make sure the groom is prepared.

Running through a checklist couldn’t hurt. If he’s getting dressed at the wedding site, make sure has has his suit/tuxedo, shirt, tie, cufflinks, and underwear, including dress socks. If he wrote custom vows, make sure he’s got a copy to bring with him.

Check in with the groomsmen.

Go over an abbreviated checklist with them to make sure they have all their outfit necessities, too. You’ll also want to remind them when they need to be ready by, where to go ahead of the ceremony, and their order during the processional.

Demonstrate how to attach a boutonnière.

Give the groomsmen a brief demo on pinning their flower to their lapel since you’ve already mastered it. Ensure everyone has attached theirs properly so they won’t fall off during photos or the ceremony.

Remember to bring the rings.

It’s a classic situation where the best man forgets all about the wedding rings and leaves them home or at the hotel. To be safe, store them in the pocket of the jacket you’ll be wearing to the wedding.

Help the groom get dressed.

This would involve tying the tie or fastening the cufflinks. The groom should know how to do the rest by himself!

The Best Maid-of-Honor Speech Examples

From raps to song covers to mashups, get inspired by these amazing maid of honor speech examples.

Whether it’s your sister or your best friend, your maid of honor will be there for you during some of the best-and also the toughest-wedding-planning moments. From the moment you tell her you’re engaged to the day she helps you calm down when your future mother-in-law gets a little too involved, the maid of honor is responsible for doing a lot. But one of the MOH’s most important tasks is giving a toast on your big day. Here, find examples of the best maid-of-honor speeches we’ve ever heard. Let these great toasts inspire your own.

Taylor Swift was the “happiest maid of honor ever” at her childhood friend Brittany Maack’s wedding. She reminisced about growing up with Maack and her husband Ben LaManna in the sweetest way, making us all grab a tissue. Check out the entire wedding video, with Swift’s speech at the 6:34 mark.

This epic six-minute mashup from two sisters featuring songs like “Backstreet’s Back” by the Backstreet Boys, “Back In Your Heart” by the Jackson Five, and “Oh Happy Day,” stole our hearts and made us laugh. The girls rapped and sang, going all-out with their performance for their sister.

This bride’s younger sister re-wrote the lyrics to “Without Me” by Eminem and rapped her maid-of-honor toast for a full five minutes. Not only does that take confidence, but also some serious lung capacity. Naturally, she got a standing ovation.

This bride’s best friend and maid of honor sang a new version of “Love Story” by Taylor Swift, recounting their friendship and watching her fall in love with her now husband. Cue the “awws!”

The bride’s younger sister flawlessly rapped her toast to Chris Brown’s “Look at Me Now.” If you know the song, then you know how fast Busta Rhymes raps his verses, and this MOH did the song justice.

Taylor Swift’s “Love Story” makes an appearance again here, with a bride’s twin sister and younger sister singing their speech. Both sisters served as MOHs, proving you can have more than one!

Source: https://www.marthastewart.com/7866840/best-maid-of-honor-speeches